Let’s talk about linen!

Linen has a rich and interesting history. For starters, it’s one of the oldest textiles (with origins dating back to 9C BC (in Lithuania since 4BC), and has a place on various continents. That’s why it occupies a special place in the folk culture of every nation.
Textiles are one of the most rich and most beautiful art branches of Lithuanian craftwork. There are mentions of linen in Lithuanian folklore from the oldest times. An archaeological dig performed in Lithuanian territory revealed that, from as early as the second century, evidence of flax and wool textiles. From the 16th century there were exports of Lithuanian linen and yarn into West Europe (Germany and Holland). The first workshops were established in the Great Duchy of Lithuania in the beginning of the 17th century.
Until the 16th century, Lithuanian’s used their local flax seeds. But because the plant does better in a colder climate, it would degenerate after two to three years in milder weather. To help the struggling farmers, Roscoff saolirs had the great idea of bringing back flax seed from the Baltic Sea region. This flax was not as demanding or delicate as flax cultivated in central Europe. The result was a boon for Lithuanian flax growers; this new flax didn’t even need rich soil and the plant would produce flowers that were three times taller.
The stalk of Lithuanian flax reaches up to 150 cm, covered with fine leaves, and with blue, pink or whitish blossom. Although Ireland remains the greatest exporter of flax, the fabric woven from Lithuania flax fibres is recognized as being of especially high quality.
Perhaps befitting of the most ancient fibre in the world, linen is beneficial for your skin. Its thermoregulatory properties provide insulation in the winter and breathability in the summer. It is anallergic and anti-bacterial, as well as being the strongest of all natural fibres.
Sometimes people ask us what sets our linen apart from other high-quality linen, such as that from Belgium or France. The short answer is that linen is a Lithuanian tradition. It is made from flax that is unique to Lithuania, and which yields a linen that is lighter than French or Belgian linen, and of much higher quality than the linen typically used in mass-produced clothes.
I think the best way to describe it is this way  LinenKids linen is lighter, smoother and cooler than other linens. Just move your hand over our linen and you’ll see exactly what I mean. the other benefit with our linen is that it gets softer with every washing. But consider this: when you choose linen over cotton, you’re helping the planet because flax (the crop from which linen is derived) requires less water to grow, requires fewer resources to grow, and all the flax by-products are put to good use.

linen_sheep

I thought it might interest some of our customers to understand why we love linen so much… so here’s a little history on my favorite textile. Enjoy!

Linen has a rich and interesting history. For starters, it’s one of the oldest textiles (with origins dating back to 9C BC (in Lithuania since 4BC), and has a place on various continents. That’s why it occupies a special place in the folk culture of every nation.

Textiles are one of the richest and most beautiful arts of Lithuanian craftwork. There are mentions of linen in Lithuanian folklore from the oldest times. An archaeological dig performed in Lithuanian territory revealed that, from as early as the second century, there was evidence of flax and wool textiles. From the 16th century there were exports of Lithuanian linen and yarn into West Europe (Germany and Holland). The first textile workshops were established in the Great Duchy of Lithuania in the beginning of the 17th century.

Until the 16th century, Lithuanians used their local flax seeds. But because the plant does better in a colder climate, it would often degenerate after two to three years in milder weather. To help the struggling farmers, Roscoff sailors had the brilliant idea of bringing back flax seed from the Baltic Sea region. This flax was not as demanding or delicate as flax cultivated in central Europe. The result was a boon for Lithuanian flax growers; this new flax didn’t even need rich soil and the plant would produce flowers that were three times taller.

The stalk of Lithuanian flax reaches up to 150 cm, covered with fine leaves, and with blue, pink or whitish blossom. Although Ireland remains the greatest exporter of flax, the fabric woven from Lithuania flax fibres is recognized as being of especially high quality.

Perhaps befitting of the most ancient fibre in the world, linen is beneficial for your skin. Its thermoregulatory properties provide insulation in the winter and breathability in the summer. It is anallergic and anti-bacterial, as well as being the strongest of all natural fibres – which means it’s durable.

Sometimes people ask us what sets our linen apart from other high-quality linen, such as that from Ireland, Belgium or France. The short answer is that linen is a Lithuanian tradition. It is made from flax that is unique to Lithuania, and which yields a linen that is lighter than other linen fabrics, and of much higher quality than the linen typically used in mass-produced clothes.

I think the best way to describe it is this way:  LinenKids linen is lighter, smoother and cooler than other linens. Just smooth your hand over our linen and you’ll see exactly what I mean. the other benefit with our linen is that it gets softer with every washing. And consider this: when you choose linen over cotton, you’re helping the planet because flax (the crop from which linen is derived) requires less water than cotton to grow, requires fewer other resources, and all the flax by-products are put to good use.

Want a few reasons why linen is the best fabric for your children?

  • Linen fabric breathes, much like human skin. In hot weather, linen texture keeps kids cool by absorbing moisture and deflecting heat, while in cool weather it retains body heat. Because it is absorbent and a good conductor of heat, linen fabric feels cool to the touch.
  • Linen is non-allergic. This makes it an ideal fabric for children’s sensitive skin, and is especially good for those with skin conditions such as allergies and eczema because it is non-allergic and has a natural pH balance. It creates a great microclimate for skin.
  • Linen is antistatic. It is especially recommended for children who are sensitive to those scary static shocks.
  • Linen absorbs moisture well. It can absorb up to 20% or more of its own weight in moisture, while still feeling dry to the touch. Linen also absorbs the moisture rapidly, which makes it wonderful for bath-time.
  • Over time, linen becomes softer and even more comfortable. Linen resists wear and tear much better than other fibers, so it will last longer than garments accessories made from cotton or artificial fabrics.
  • Linen resists stains like no other fabric and is completely washable at both high and low temperatures, without losing any of its excellent properties, texture or shape.
  • Best of all, linen is eco-friendly!. It comes from flax and every part of the plant is used. The linen production process is sustainable and does not cause any harm to nature.

So you now you can enjoy linen even more!

Advertisements

5 responses to “Let’s talk about linen!

  1. Hello,

    a very informative article about linen. Thanks for posting it!

  2. Hi from Japan!
    I am the one who loves and is fascinated by linen.
    This article is so informative!
    Now I love linen so much more.
    Thanks you!! 🙂

  3. This bedding is gorgeous, I love the little sheep!

  4. Do you sell this bedding anymore? I can’t find it on the site!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s