Category Archives: Linen

LinenKids Was Acquired by LinenMe: New Assortment is Coming in Summer 2013

We are happy to announce a new step of LinenKids brand: it was acquired by a successful linen textile brand LinenMe which is planning to renew the assortment and enhance customer support as well as offer services of production of bespoken products in large quantities.

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Linen + plastic? Why not!

A young Lithuanian designer Zygimante Astrauskaite from the Vilnius Art Academy decided that such a natural and eco-friendly fabric as linen can match quite well with used plastic packaging from snacks and other everyday items. Her collection ephasises both the current eco-friendly and recycling trends in fashion industry and the consumerism of today’s society. Check out some designs from the collection in the pictures below.

A design by Z. Astrauskaite - photo by Egle Jociute

A design by Z. Astrauskaite - photo by Egle Jociute

A design by Z. Astrauskaite - photo by Egle Jociute

A design by Z. Astrauskaite - photo by Egle Jociute

Linen in this season’s fashion

As we’ve mentioned in previous posts, eco-friendly fabrics, including linen, are becoming more and more popular every year both in ready-to-wear and high fashion.

Lithuanian designers say that this year there are a few silhouettes of linen clothes that are popular. The first one is 80’s style: emphasised waist and straight lines, including bell-bottom pants, wide skirts and shirts with shoulder widening effect. Another popular silhouette is a straight one, including straight pants and dresses.

A model by G. Sarkauskas - delfi.lt

The length of linen dresses, skirts and pants can vary from knee-high to very long. The most popular colours this season are white and the natural linen colour, which is a lot like the colour of sand. White linen colour has already become a summer classic. If you don’t like these neutral colours, you can choose blue, green, yellow or red linen clothes – all of these are more or less fashionable this year.

The linen fabric can be woven in various patterns. Vertical or horizontal, narrow or wide, curves or straight lines meet circles, dots and various floral motives – it doesn’t really matter this year, as linen looks wonderful in any pattern.

A model by A. Anaite - delfi.lt

Bright coloured clothes could be matched with vivid, contrasting details and accessories. Sand and grey coloured clothes can be jazzed up with brightly coloured straps or flowers and a colourful purse or wrap.

However, you should always leave space for imagination – sometimes the best fashion creations are born at home. 🙂

2010 Spring/Summer arrivals

Little by little spring is taking over, and LinenKids proudly presents our newest linen clothes for children for spring and summer season of year 2010.

No flashy colors, but discreet designs and decorations to keep the clothes perfect for special occasions but definitely playful and absolutely fashionable

The designs are almost classical, but with delicate details which make the garment unique and tempting.

Girls White Linen Summer Dress is so simple, yet so delicate that your little girl will attract everyone’s attention. Girls Wavy White Linen Dress is adorned with a tiny asymmetric linen lace on the waist and at the hem, which will make your princess stand out from the crowd.

Easy styled Lounge Boys Linen Outfit is a great choice for every day and special occasions. Stylish, yet comfortable Boys White Linen Summer Outfit will be your boy’s favorite to wear for picnics and family gatherings.

Basic at first view but rich of many charming details which make LinenKids clothes irresistible!

Soft to touch, comfortable to wear, LinenKids new designs are already here!

Linen Hand Knitted Scarves

Do you feel like your girl’s outfit is missing something? Do you need something to cover up if the day get breezy? Put a final touch to the outfit – cover shoulders with this luxurious scarf!

Choose your favorite color to match different outfits. Scarves are handmade of the highest quality 100% pure linen, making the scarf so light and so beautiful. It feels like nothing on your shoulders, but it looks fabulous!

A comfortable and versatile garment is perfect for handcrafted gifts – one size fits it all! The best thing is that mothers and daughters can always share this luxurious Linen Hand Knitted Scarf! And the last, but not the least fact is that this scarf is easy to care (delicate mashine washing)!

Be the first one try it on! We are offering Natural Linen Hand Knitted Scarf for you on Facebook! Just let us know why would you like to get it. Giveaway is open for everyone, worldwide, so do not hesitate!

The giveaway ends on Saturday, so hurry up and enter now!

Let’s talk about linen!

Linen has a rich and interesting history. For starters, it’s one of the oldest textiles (with origins dating back to 9C BC (in Lithuania since 4BC), and has a place on various continents. That’s why it occupies a special place in the folk culture of every nation.
Textiles are one of the most rich and most beautiful art branches of Lithuanian craftwork. There are mentions of linen in Lithuanian folklore from the oldest times. An archaeological dig performed in Lithuanian territory revealed that, from as early as the second century, evidence of flax and wool textiles. From the 16th century there were exports of Lithuanian linen and yarn into West Europe (Germany and Holland). The first workshops were established in the Great Duchy of Lithuania in the beginning of the 17th century.
Until the 16th century, Lithuanian’s used their local flax seeds. But because the plant does better in a colder climate, it would degenerate after two to three years in milder weather. To help the struggling farmers, Roscoff saolirs had the great idea of bringing back flax seed from the Baltic Sea region. This flax was not as demanding or delicate as flax cultivated in central Europe. The result was a boon for Lithuanian flax growers; this new flax didn’t even need rich soil and the plant would produce flowers that were three times taller.
The stalk of Lithuanian flax reaches up to 150 cm, covered with fine leaves, and with blue, pink or whitish blossom. Although Ireland remains the greatest exporter of flax, the fabric woven from Lithuania flax fibres is recognized as being of especially high quality.
Perhaps befitting of the most ancient fibre in the world, linen is beneficial for your skin. Its thermoregulatory properties provide insulation in the winter and breathability in the summer. It is anallergic and anti-bacterial, as well as being the strongest of all natural fibres.
Sometimes people ask us what sets our linen apart from other high-quality linen, such as that from Belgium or France. The short answer is that linen is a Lithuanian tradition. It is made from flax that is unique to Lithuania, and which yields a linen that is lighter than French or Belgian linen, and of much higher quality than the linen typically used in mass-produced clothes.
I think the best way to describe it is this way  LinenKids linen is lighter, smoother and cooler than other linens. Just move your hand over our linen and you’ll see exactly what I mean. the other benefit with our linen is that it gets softer with every washing. But consider this: when you choose linen over cotton, you’re helping the planet because flax (the crop from which linen is derived) requires less water to grow, requires fewer resources to grow, and all the flax by-products are put to good use.

linen_sheep

I thought it might interest some of our customers to understand why we love linen so much… so here’s a little history on my favorite textile. Enjoy!

Linen has a rich and interesting history. For starters, it’s one of the oldest textiles (with origins dating back to 9C BC (in Lithuania since 4BC), and has a place on various continents. That’s why it occupies a special place in the folk culture of every nation.

Textiles are one of the richest and most beautiful arts of Lithuanian craftwork. There are mentions of linen in Lithuanian folklore from the oldest times. An archaeological dig performed in Lithuanian territory revealed that, from as early as the second century, there was evidence of flax and wool textiles. From the 16th century there were exports of Lithuanian linen and yarn into West Europe (Germany and Holland). The first textile workshops were established in the Great Duchy of Lithuania in the beginning of the 17th century.

Until the 16th century, Lithuanians used their local flax seeds. But because the plant does better in a colder climate, it would often degenerate after two to three years in milder weather. To help the struggling farmers, Roscoff sailors had the brilliant idea of bringing back flax seed from the Baltic Sea region. This flax was not as demanding or delicate as flax cultivated in central Europe. The result was a boon for Lithuanian flax growers; this new flax didn’t even need rich soil and the plant would produce flowers that were three times taller.

The stalk of Lithuanian flax reaches up to 150 cm, covered with fine leaves, and with blue, pink or whitish blossom. Although Ireland remains the greatest exporter of flax, the fabric woven from Lithuania flax fibres is recognized as being of especially high quality.

Perhaps befitting of the most ancient fibre in the world, linen is beneficial for your skin. Its thermoregulatory properties provide insulation in the winter and breathability in the summer. It is anallergic and anti-bacterial, as well as being the strongest of all natural fibres – which means it’s durable.

Sometimes people ask us what sets our linen apart from other high-quality linen, such as that from Ireland, Belgium or France. The short answer is that linen is a Lithuanian tradition. It is made from flax that is unique to Lithuania, and which yields a linen that is lighter than other linen fabrics, and of much higher quality than the linen typically used in mass-produced clothes.

I think the best way to describe it is this way:  LinenKids linen is lighter, smoother and cooler than other linens. Just smooth your hand over our linen and you’ll see exactly what I mean. the other benefit with our linen is that it gets softer with every washing. And consider this: when you choose linen over cotton, you’re helping the planet because flax (the crop from which linen is derived) requires less water than cotton to grow, requires fewer other resources, and all the flax by-products are put to good use.

Want a few reasons why linen is the best fabric for your children?

  • Linen fabric breathes, much like human skin. In hot weather, linen texture keeps kids cool by absorbing moisture and deflecting heat, while in cool weather it retains body heat. Because it is absorbent and a good conductor of heat, linen fabric feels cool to the touch.
  • Linen is non-allergic. This makes it an ideal fabric for children’s sensitive skin, and is especially good for those with skin conditions such as allergies and eczema because it is non-allergic and has a natural pH balance. It creates a great microclimate for skin.
  • Linen is antistatic. It is especially recommended for children who are sensitive to those scary static shocks.
  • Linen absorbs moisture well. It can absorb up to 20% or more of its own weight in moisture, while still feeling dry to the touch. Linen also absorbs the moisture rapidly, which makes it wonderful for bath-time.
  • Over time, linen becomes softer and even more comfortable. Linen resists wear and tear much better than other fibers, so it will last longer than garments accessories made from cotton or artificial fabrics.
  • Linen resists stains like no other fabric and is completely washable at both high and low temperatures, without losing any of its excellent properties, texture or shape.
  • Best of all, linen is eco-friendly!. It comes from flax and every part of the plant is used. The linen production process is sustainable and does not cause any harm to nature.

So you now you can enjoy linen even more!